Employment and Investment

FINDING A JOB

SOCIAL INSURANCE NUMBER
     You must have your Social Insurance Number ( SIN) to work in Canada. If you do

      not have it, you can apply for one at the Human Resources Development Centre.The

      Human Resources Development Centre is an important place to visit for other help

      information and help you may need, such as finding job. For more information, look

      in the Blue Pages in the Government of Canada section under “Human Resources

      Development Canada”  for your area.

RESUME
When applying for a job, many companies ask for a resume. It is a written summary

Of your education and work experience. Friends and even the immigrant settlement

Agency may be able to help you writing your resume.

3.   STARTING YOUR OWN BUSINESS

     There are rules to follow to start a business. The business must be registered and

     Licensed by the government. There are government programs that may help you

     Start a business. For more information, call The Canada-B.C. Business Service

     Centre at 777-5525 ( in lower mainland) and 1-800-667-2272 ( elsewhere).

WORKING

LAWS ABOUT WORKING
In B.C., there is a law to protect most workers, which is called the “Employment

Standard Act.” Both workers and employers have responsibilities under this Act.

Call the Employment Standards Branch for more information at 660-4000 ( in

lower mainland) and 1-800-663-3316 ( elsewhere).

HOURS OF WORK AND OVERTIME
In B.C., workers usually work eight hours a day and 40 hours a week. If you work

More than this, then you must get overtime pay, which is at least 1.5 times your

Hourly pay. If you get to go to work and there isn’t any work to do, then you must

Get paid for two hours of work. If you end up working only a short time, then you

Must be paid for four hours of work.

TIME OFF
After working for five hours, you should get a 30 minutes break. The employer

Doesn’t have to pay you for this time. If you work a split shift, the time between

When you start work in the day and the time you stop work cannot be more than 12

Hours. You must have 32 consecutive hours free from work each week. If your

Employer asks you to work during the 32 hours, you must get paid for double time,

Which is two times your hourly pay.  

4.   GETTING PAID

      Most workers get paid by cheque every two weeks. Your employer must give you

      A pay slip with every cheque.

DEDUCTIONS
The employer must deduct money from your pay cheque to pay for the following:

       (i)  CANADA PENSION PLAN (CPP)

             You pay money into this plan each month that you work. As a result, when you

             Retire, you may receive a pension from the government.

     (ii)  EMPLOYMENT INSURANCE (EI)

       You pay money into this plan each month that you work. If you lose your job,

       You may receive money from the government while you look for a new job.

(iii) INCOME TAX

       This money helps to pay the costs of government expenses, such as health care

       And education.

(iv) TAXABLE BENEFITS

       Your employer may provide some benefits, such as dental plan and pension plan,

       Which are considered taxable benefits by Revenue Canada. The value of these

       Benefits is deducted from your pay cheque.

(v) UNION DUES

      If you are in a union and the union has an agreement with your employer, some

      Money will be deducted to pay for the union dues.

    (vi) VOLUNTARY DEDUCTIONS

           Your employer may deduct additional amounts for things that you have given

           Your permission to deduct, such as additional life insurance coverage and

     Purchase Canada Savings Bonds through deductions from your pay cheque.

MINIMUM WAGE
In B.C. as of April 1st, 1998, the minimum wage is $7.15 per hour.

VACATIONS
All workers must get at least two weeks of paid vacation every year. If you leave

Your job before you take your vacation, your employer must give you the vacation

Pay, which is at least four per cent of your earnings.

HOLYDAYS
In B.C., workers must get the statutory holidays. If you work on any of the

Statutory holidays, you must be paid overtime rate or give you other day off. For

More information, call the Employment Standards Branch.

8.  MATERNITY LEAVE

     A working pregnant woman may take 18 weeks off work without pay, which can

     Start up to 11 weeks before the delivery of the baby. If necessary, she can take up to

     Another six consecutive weeks without pay. She/he may also take up to 12 weeks of

     Parental leave after the baby is born. She may apply for money from Employment

     Insurance ( EI) during her maternity leave.

EMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ( EI)
It is money the government gives to someone who loses a job. When you work, a

Small amount of money is deducted from your pay cheque each month. In case if

You are laid off, you may get money to live on while you are looking for a new job.

For more information, contact the Human Resources Development Centre near you.

10. GETTING HURT AT WORK

     The Workers’ Compensation Board (WCB) helps workers who are injured at work.

     If you cannot work because you got hurt or sick at work may get money from WCB.

     If you have an accident at work, report to the authority immediately. For more

     Information, contact WCB at 660-7888 ( in lower mainland) and 1-800-663-4261

     ( elsewhere in B.C.).